Wheel wells

Discussion in 'Renegade Stock Tech' started by robinsonmac, Jun 26, 2017.

  1. robinsonmac

    robinsonmac Member

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    Anyone know why Renegades wheels aren't centered in the wheel wells?

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  2. Thomas Duryea

    Thomas Duryea Active Member

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    Because they suck at simple things

    You can get a centering kit for some $30

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  3. robinsonmac

    robinsonmac Member

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    How would that work? wouldn't you have to move the axles. Looks like the the body and wheels are from different vehicles.

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  4. TWX

    TWX Active Member

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    I haven't noticed the wheels being particularly forward or backward on our TH. I did just replace the control arms on my '95 Impala SS because the rear axle is almost 3/4" too far forward on a stock Impala or Caprice. Changing those on that car was a real pain. I probably wouldn't have even done it without two post lift.
     
  5. robinsonmac

    robinsonmac Member

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    The back wheels sit forward of the wheel well. Maybe to allow for mud & snow?


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  6. TWX

    TWX Active Member

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    Well, looking at the picture on jeep's website, it looks like the rear wheelwell is not symmetric front to back. The front edge looks more sloped than the back.

    The Jeep Renegade is actually built on a platform originally developed as a joint-effort between Fiat and General Motors' European Opel Division. I'm going to hedge a bet that decisions made in the design of that platform long before Chrysler's involvement have a lot to do with the rear door opening as it relates to the wheel well, so it was necessary to work around those constraints when designing the Renegade and possibly the 500X.

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  7. MFlores757

    MFlores757 Member

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    I dont know WHY it is that way but I do know it will be corrected if you lift it. IMO, this should have been the factory height anyways.
     

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  8. TWX

    TWX Active Member

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    Well, remember that when a vehicle is designed that just about everything is compromise. My wife is 5'7" tall and has to just-hop to get into the seat with this as her daily driver. This is part of the reason why I vetoed looking at any non-Trailhawk models, I wanted her to get used to this height and not think that the lower ones were acceptable.

    A taller ride height would have been more difficult to get into. Remember, Jeep has to sell vehicles to people that like the idea of being able to go anywhere, do anything, even if they don't actually go anywhere, do anything. My own household is a case in point, we only took one dirt road before my wife's pregnancy forced us to refrain from offroad driving. There have been some moments when inclement weather was less of a problem with the four wheel drive system, but so far our TH has probably driven all of five miles off pavement in its 13,000 or so on the odometer.

    Lastly, the vehicle has to pass an obstacle avoidance test referred to as the moose test. This forces the vehicle to make a sharp turn out of one's lane, into oncoming traffic, and back into one's lane again, at high speed. This is the test that doomed the Suzuki Samurai to extinction in the United States and severely hurt Isuzu and forced a redesign of the 2nd generation Isuzu Rodeo. Jeep has had to tread very carefully with this test; if they have too much propensity for rollover then even if offroad enthusiasts love 'em, a lot of buyers will shy away. I doubt that the moose test has been performed on heavily modified vehicles, so it's hard to say how much worse they'd do, but moving-up the center of gravity would make that test harder to pass.
     
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